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Showing category "Georgian" (Show all posts)

New walk for International Women's Day 2016

Posted by London Guided Walks on Wednesday, November 25, 2015, In : Georgian 

International Women's Day is celebrated in many countries around the world. It is a day when women are recognised for their achievements without regard to any differences.

Fanny Burney was a self-educated female author of enlightenment.

On 29 January 1778, Fanny’s first novel, Evelina, or A Young Lady’s Entrance into the World, was published. The book was written in letter form and published anonymously and secretly with the help of her brother; not even her father, a music teache...


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Visit the Wellington Arch

Posted by London Guided Walks on Thursday, June 18, 2015, In : Georgian 

Today is the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo. Wellington Arch is an English Heritage property which has an interesting exhibition about the battle and reveals a few details which are missed from the English history class rooms.

Wellington Arch now sits at Hyde Park Corner, where Kensington Road meets Piccadilly near its junction with Park Lane, and where the Kensington Turnpike Trust had its tollgate. As a result, Hyde Park Corner became thought of unofficially as the new entrance...


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Georgian Clerkenwell & Islington

Posted by London Guided Walks on Monday, October 13, 2014, In : Georgian 


On Saturday many tour guides provided guided walks in London based on the theme of the Georgians for Local London Guiding Day 2014.



Luckily in Clerkenwell & Islington we are spoilt for choice as to what to include in an hours walk. The problem then is to decide what to include. Each guide designed their own walk around particular stops. Mine included Islington Tunnel, the Angel Inn, George Cruikshank and a young Charles Dickens as well as middle class houses and Georgians shops. No Georgian...


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The Start of the Georgians

Posted by London Guided Walks on Saturday, August 23, 2014, In : Georgian 

Queen Anne of Great Britain & Ireland (1665-1714)

Only one of Queen Anne's seventeen pregnancies produced a potential heir, William, Duke of Gloucester (1689-1700). His death in July 1700 at the tender age of eleven caused Parliament to institute the Act of Settlement making Electress Sophia of Hanover heiress presumptive. Electress Sophia died two months before Queen Anne.


In 1714 Queen Anne died and was succeeded by her second cousin, Georg Ludwig, Elector of Hanover. Georg was an appealing c...


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