Make the most of London

Browsing Archive: August, 2014

Artist Walter Sickert in Highbury

Posted by London Guided Walks on Thursday, August 28, 2014, In : Art 

Walter Sickert, Victorian artist & actor

At 1 Highbury Place there is a Georgian building with the green plaque was once Walter Sickert’s school of painting and engraving.



Walter Richard Sickert was a late Victorian painter who came from an artistic family. He had a particular fondness for Islington which was a major presence at both ends of Sickert’s life, personally and professionally.


It was a 5yr old Walter Sickert who first visited Islington. In 1865 he attended St Mark’s Hospital, Ci...


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John Betjeman in Highbury

Posted by London Guided Walks on Thursday, August 28, 2014, In : 20th century 

St Saviour's Church, Aberdeen Park

Aberdeen Park is an unexpected expansive leafy haven in inner London with public access. The residents are responsible for most aspects of Aberdeen Park's upkeep and is reflected in its relaxing ambience. Why aren't more places like this?


There are 341 address in Aberdeen park, predominantly domestic architecture covering 150 years.


There are four storey Victorian villas on the South and East perimeter with iconic Italianate towers built in 1850's for prosperou...


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How did King's Cross get its name?

Posted by London Guided Walks on Thursday, August 28, 2014, In : Guided Walks 

How did King's Cross get its name? 


What it was King's Cross called before that and why? 

Ever wanted to know how we got the expression to dance on someone's grave? Or what a circus really is?


Explore with us a hidden London on this 90 mins walk. There will also be a post walk drinks option. Feel free to bring friends or come on your own. 

This walk involves 2 flights of stairs and so not suitable for the less able.

"Who needs Ibiza when you have Kings Cross!" Billy Reilly, Nightclub Entrepreneur

B...


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New River Head

Posted by London Guided Walks on Tuesday, August 26, 2014, In : Hidden 

Clerkenwell is an area flowing with history of London's water supply. There is Myddelton Square, Amwell Street, Chadwell Street, Myddelton Street and River Street all in recognition to the New River. 



The New River Head, is on Rosebery Avenue and was built in 1920 to a design by Herbert Austen Hall who is more famously associated with the post-war design of several livery halls, primarily the re-building of Carpenters' and Clothworkers' Halls, but also the interior and north part of Fishmonger...


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Hidden London - Wardrobe Place

Posted by London Guided Walks on Tuesday, August 26, 2014, In : Hidden 

Hidden London - Wardrobe Place, EC4V


Wardrobe Place is a little courtyard just off Carter Lane. This is hidden place in London which feels like the streets were left untouched by the great fire in 1666. This, however, is an illusion as they were all burned down. 

What is the King's wardrobe? 

King’s wardrobe established by medieval king Edward III – kept ceremonial robes of state, on view just as crown jewels are today.

The Wardrobe, originally housed within the Tower of London was where (as ...

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Cloudesley Square, Barnsbury

Posted by London Guided Walks on Monday, August 25, 2014, In : Local History 

Cloudesley square was the first square to be built over the Barnsbury area of Islington and was originally part of the Cloudesley Estate. 

Cloudesley Square, Barnsbury, London

The site of the square was formerly known as Stoneyfield and in the C16th was owned by Sir Richard Cloudesley. By the early C19th, the area was leased by dairy farmer Samuel Rhodes (great grandfather of the founder of De Beers diamond company Cecil Rhodes).


It wasn’t long before areas of the Estate were being chosen for ...


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Exploring London on foot

Posted by London Guided Walks on Sunday, August 24, 2014, In : Quirky 

“London is a city that needs, that demands, to be explored on foot.”
Geoff Nicholson, The Lost Art of Walking


The pace of London and its people moves so fast that the ability of being able to observe and absorb one’s surroundings certainly requires the speed of travel be slowed down. And what better speed to decrease down to than that of walking? It is a way of actually shifting a state of consciousness.

There are many nooks and crannies of London that cannot be seen and/or appreciated at ...


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History of Ice cream in London

Posted by London Guided Walks on Sunday, August 24, 2014, In : Victorian 


History of ice cream in London
It's on hot days like today where we Londoners should thank Victorian entrepreneur Carlo Gatti for introducing us to this splendid cool nectar.



Carlo Gatti came to London in 1847 travelling from the Italian speaking region of Switzerland. He began his business selling refreshments to normal Londoners from a stall selling a waffle-like treat sprinkled with sugar in the summer and chestnuts in winter.

Gatti lived in Holborn where there was an established Italian comm...

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What does the Coat of Arms of the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries mean?

Posted by London Guided Walks on Saturday, August 23, 2014, In : Art 

What is a Coat of Arms?

During medieval times a coat of arms was very important. It told everybody who you were, what family you belonged to, who your relatives were, what territory you may hold. It basically said everything about a powerful person that you wanted (and needed) people to know.

A coat of arms is a unique design belonging to a particular person (or group of people i.e. the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries) and is used by them in a wide variety of ways. Some of these ways include...


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The Start of the Georgians

Posted by London Guided Walks on Saturday, August 23, 2014, In : Georgian 

Queen Anne of Great Britain & Ireland (1665-1714)

Only one of Queen Anne's seventeen pregnancies produced a potential heir, William, Duke of Gloucester (1689-1700). His death in July 1700 at the tender age of eleven caused Parliament to institute the Act of Settlement making Electress Sophia of Hanover heiress presumptive. Electress Sophia died two months before Queen Anne.


In 1714 Queen Anne died and was succeeded by her second cousin, Georg Ludwig, Elector of Hanover. Georg was an appealing c...


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History of Mason's Yard, Mayfair

Posted by London Guided Walks on Thursday, August 21, 2014, In : Art 

History of Mason's Yard, Mayfair

Mason's Yard SW1

Ormond Yard was laid out as a 200 feet square plot of land originally designed to be a stable yard and by 1740 the yard was already being called Mason's Yard, probably due to the owner of the two houses fronting both the yard and Duke street was a Mr Henry Mason. It would make sense for him to have rented some stables in Mason's Yard.


In 1748 the London Evening Post reported a death 'at his House in Duke-Street' of a Mr. Margison 'who for several...


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Rhinoceros in London

Posted by London Guided Walks on Thursday, August 21, 2014, In : Art 

The worshipful Society of Apothecaries's Hall is filled with rhinoceros, but why?

It's probably one of the most famous and certainly one of the most influential images of an exotic animal to be made.

Towards the end of 1515 Manuel I of Portugal sent an Indian rhinoceros as a present to Pope Leo X. Private menageries housing exotic animals were popular in aristocratic circles in Europe in C15th & C16th. 

Durer drew a rhinoceros without having seen one. He used a description and a living sketch of...


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The National Police Memorial

Posted by London Guided Walks on Thursday, August 21, 2014, In : Art 

National Police Memorial

Seated at Cambridge Green, on the corner of The Mall and Horse Guards Road, directly outside the Old Admiralty Building.The site had previously been occupied by an air shaft on the Bakerloo Line of the London Underground.


The National Police Memorial consists of two distinct parts; a black granite clad tablet with a glass cabinet containing a book listing the names of every British police officer killed during arrests or as a result of criminal acts. Alongside that is t...


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Royal Artillery Memorial, Hyde Park Corner

Posted by London Guided Walks on Thursday, August 21, 2014, In : Art 

What is the objective of having a war memorial? 

To remember the dead? To bask in the glory of sacrifice for King and country? Ex-servicemen were quoted by the Manchester Guardian as reminiscing about the war as they examined the statue, and remarking on how the bronze figures had captured the reality of their time in the artillery. The newspaper noted that the frankness of the portrayal was a "terrible revelation long overdue", and hoped that veterans would be able to show the monument to the...


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Christie's in London

Posted by London Guided Walks on Thursday, August 21, 2014, In : Art 

Christie's is the world's oldest fine art auctioneer and has sold fine art, furniture, jewellery and wine since 1766, when James Christie conducted the very first sale in London. Since then, Christie's has continued to build its reputation as the perfect backdrop for the sales of the world's finest collections and greatest works of art before their auction. 


It was in 1823 when Christie's moved to its global headquarters at 8 King Street, St. James's, which remains to be its London headquarter...


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History of the Carousel

Posted by London Guided Walks on Wednesday, August 20, 2014, In : Quirky 

A carousel could be considered to be a key component of any fayre. But how did it the carousel come about?


Horsing Around

It's believed that in 1100's, Arabian and Turkish horsemen competed in a game played on horseback. 

Italian and Spanish crusaders who witnessed this sport described the contest as a "little war" or garosello and carosella respectively based on the ferocity the horsemen played.

When the crusaders returned home, they brought the game back with them where, over time, became an ex...

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The lamps are going out all over Europe

Posted by London Guided Walks on Wednesday, August 20, 2014, In : Art 


One hundred years ago Sir Edward Grey, Foreign Secretary stated to his friend and journalist John Alfred Spender, editor of the Westminster Gazette "the lamps are going out all over Europe, we shall not see them lit again in our life-time." It was dusk as he was watched the first of the gas lights along the Mall were being lit. The next day Grey would face the Cabinet and persuade them that the time had now come to declare war on Germany.

From what had been a European war, when Britain declare...


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A City surrounded by dragons

Posted by London Guided Walks on Wednesday, August 20, 2014, In : Quirky 
The City of London is surrounded by dragons but why? 


How are dragons perceived in western culture?

In classical legend, dragons are associated with guarding something. For example, in Greek mythology, a ten headed dragon guarded the golden apples, in the Garden of the Hesperides. In medieval romance dragons spend a lot of time guarding pretty, captive women i.e. the princess in the tower story we all know so well.


How are dragons portrayed in literature and language?

Dragons are mention...


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Henry VIII and his family jewels

Posted by London Guided Walks on Wednesday, August 20, 2014, In : Tudor 

The statue of Henry VIII on top of the main entrance gate to St Bartholomew’s Hospital in West Smithfield is apparently the only public statue of the Tudor king in London. Is familiar frontal stance shows off his shapely calves and codpiece off to full advantage.

What is a codpiece?

The word comes from Middle English with cod meaning scrotum and was originally required to provide a fashionable man of the Middle Ages with modesty as the short doublets failed to do so.

What is a Tudor codpiece?

...


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Hazel's London blog

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